Determination of Occupational Stress and Its Related Factors in Female Staff of Kashan University of Medical Sciences

  • Hamid Reza Saberi
  • Saba Karimi
  • Masoud Motalebi Kashani
Keywords: Job stress, Employees, Woman, Kashan

Abstract

Background and Aim: The phenomenon of stress is one of the fundamental problems in the last few decades following the changes and developments of societies and the advent of modern life that has put people at risk. The aim of this study was to determine the level of occupational stress and its related factors in female staff of Kashan University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This is a cross-sectional descriptive study and the sample size was all female employees (132 persons) working in faculties and departments of Kashan University of Medical Sciences in 2016. The UK HSE occupational stress questionnaire was used to measure occupational stress. Data were imported into SPSS16 software and analyzed using Chi-square and Fisher exact test.  Findings: Only two variables showed a significant statistical relationship with job stress; hours of work and the workplace (P-value <0.05), but there was no significant statistical relationship between job shift, education level and employment status (P-value> 0.05). Conclusion: The high level of occupational stress among employees of the deputies indicate the importance of reducing the working hours of the staff to the standard working hours of other countries, as well as the periodic shift of staff from the deputies to the faculties.

 

Author Biographies

Hamid Reza Saberi

Occupational medicine specialist,,Associate Professor, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Social Determinants Health Research Center, Kashan, Iran.

 

Saba Karimi

Instructor, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah. Iran.

Masoud Motalebi Kashani

Occupational Health Specialist. Associate Professor, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Social Determinants Health Research Center, Kashan, Iran.

 

Published
2019-01-08
Section
Research Articles